Citation

CMS Format: Bibliography

General Overview:

Chicago Manual of Style (CMS) format is mainly used in the humanities, especially in history. This documentation style presents content without parenthetical citations to sources; sources are cited within the text with superscript numbers that refer readers to one of two options for complete source information:

a) Footnotes (at the bottom of the page; see CMS Format: Footnotes)
b) Endnotes (all notes in sequence collected in a NOTES page after the paper itself; see CMS Format: Endnotes).

CMS citation generally includes a BIBLIOGRAPHY (discussed here) at the very end of the paper. 

(Check with your instructor to see if you need both NOTES and a BIBLIOGRAPHY. In some cases, the NOTES may be sufficient. CMS also has an alternate system of parenthetical author-date references; see CMSCh. 15.)

General Guidelines:

  • The BIBLIOGRAPHY appears at the end of the paper after any NOTES. Note that when a BIBLIOGRAPHY is included, only short-form NOTES (author and page) may be needed. Consult with your instructor.
  • Include all works cited and consulted other than personal communications. (See CMS 14.218-9, 14.222-3 for personal communication.)
  • Use 12-pt. Times New Roman font.

Conventions:

  • Center “BIBLIOGRAPHY,” and double-space twice below. Single space entries with double spaces between entries.
  • Alphabetize by author’s last name; if author has two publications, list by date order, earliest first, and replace the author’s name in the second entry with the 3-em dash (see CMS 14.63-5 and example below).
  • Type the first line of each entry flush left and indent additional lines five spaces (called a hanging indent).
  • If you need to break a URL at the end of a line, do so based on the URL: after a colon or a double slash; before a single slash, a tilde (~), a period, a comma, a hyphen, an underline, a question mark, a number sign, or a percent symbol. You may break the URL either before or after an equal sign or an ampersand (&). (See CMS 14.12.)

 

Examples:

Book:

(CMS 14.16-18)

Print:

Jarvis, Brad D. E. The Brothertown Nation of Indians: Land Ownership and Nationalism in Early America, 1740- 
       
 1840. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2010.

Electronic:

Steinberg, Ted. Acts of God: The Unnatural History of Natural Disaster in America. New York: Oxford University 
         Press, 2010. E-book.

 

Book with two or three authors:

(CMS 14.76)

Cleveland, William L., and Martin Bunton. A History of the Modern Middle East. Boulder: Westview Press, 2009.

 

Article or chapter in an edited book:

(CMS 14.112)

Braddock, Robert C. “To Serve the Queen.” In Tudor Queenship: The Reigns of Mary and Elizabeth, edited by Alice 
         Hunt and Anne Whitelock, 225-38. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.

 

Anonymous works: 

(CMS 14.79)

A True and Sincere Declaration of the Purpose and Ends of the Plantation Begun in Virginia, of the Degrees Which it              Hath Received, and Means by Which it Hath Been Advanced. London, 1610.

 

Journal article:

(CMS 14.175-202)

Print, one author:

Ahn, Byungil. “Reinventing Scientific Medicine for the Socialist Republic: The Soviet Psycho-Prophylactic Method of                Delivery in 1950s China.” Twentieth-Century China 38, no. 2 (2013): 139-155.

Print, more than three authors:*

Sue, Derald Wing, et al. “Racial Microaggressions in Everyday Life.” American Psychologist 62 (May-June 2007): 271.

Online with doi (digital object identifier):

Henry, Paul C. “How Mainstream Consumers Think about Consumer Rights and Responsibilities.” The Journal of                    Consumer Research 37, no. 4 (2010): 670-687. doi: 10.1086/653657.

Online without doi (digital object identifier):

Peret, Teresa C. T., and Guy Boivin. “Characterization of Human Metapneumoviruses Isolated from Patients in North            America.” The Journal of Infectious Diseases 185, no. 11 (2002): 1660-63. http://jid.oxfordjournals.org/content          /185 /11/1660.full.

*For print journal articles with two or three authors, see previous guidelines for “book with two or three authors.”

 

Newspaper article:

(CMS 14.203-04 & 14.271-72)

Print:

Archibald, Randall C. “Judge Blocks Arizona’s Immigration Law.” New York Times, July 29, 2010. 

Online:

Klein, Ezra, and Evan Soltas. “Wonkbook: Time is the Enemy on Immigration Reform.” Washington Post, April 22,                2013. http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/04/22/wonkbook-time-is-the-enemy-on-                    immigration-reform/.

 

Website:

(CMS 14.243-46)

“U. S. Grant:  In His Shoes.” PBS.  Accessed December 29, 2010. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience                  /features/photo-gallery/grant-shoes.

 

Film (DVDs and Videos): 

(CMS 14.279)

An Inconvenient Truth. Hollywood: Paramount, 2006. DVD.

 

Example Bibliography:

Note: does not reflect proper margin settings.

    15

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY

 

An Inconvenient Truth. Hollywood: Paramount, 2006. DVD.

Archibald, Randall C. “Judge Blocks Arizona’s Immigration Law.” New York Times, July 29, 2010.

Braddock, Robert C. “To Serve the Queen.” In Tudor Queenship: The Reigns of Mary and Elizabeth, edited by Alice Hunt          and Anne Whitelock, 225-38. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.

Henry, Paul C. “How Mainstream Consumers Think about Consumer Rights and Responsibilities.” The Journal of                      Consumer Research 37, no. 4 (2010): 670-687. doi: 10.1086/653657.

“U. S. Grant: In His Shoes.” PBS. Accessed December 29, 2010. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/
         features/photo-gallery/grant-shoes.

Wright, Richard. American Hunger: The Compelling Continuation of Richard Wright’s Autobiographical Work, Black                  Boy. New York: Harper, 1977.

——. Black Boy. 60th anniversary ed. New York: Harper Perennial Modern Classics, 2007.