May 11, 2017

Sloan Klaski: Portrait of a 2017 SVSU graduate

From: Harbor Beach

High school: Harbor Beach High School

Major: Criminal Justice & Marketing double major

Future: graduate school, SVSU's Masters in Business Administration

Sloan Klaski looks to the future with excitement and a smile on his face as he describes his goals in the years to come. Many Saginaw Valley State University graduates share his positive outlook; few have faced as many obstacles.

A standout football player at small Harbor Beach High School in Michigan's Thumb, Klaski was featured on the front page of The Detroit Free Press sports section in November 2012, but not for making plays on the gridiron. "Klaski leads from the sidelines," the headline read, a reference to how he supported his teammates through an injury that denied him nearly all of his senior season.

Klaski came to SVSU to play linebacker while majoring in both criminal justice and marketing. He recorded 47 tackles in each of his first two seasons before injury struck again, forcing him to miss the 2016 season.

Life has taught Klaski a lesson or two about determination, so while he graduated in May, he is not finished in the classroom or on the football field. Due to his injury, he has two seasons of college eligibility remaining and a graduate degree in his sights.

When Klaski completes his football career, he plans to serve his country.

"I'll be getting my M.B.A. through SVSU," he said. "My goal is to end up getting into a federal law enforcement agency, whether that's the FBI or DEA, something like that."

For his senior seminar, Klaski took a class with Joseph Jaksa, SVSU associate professor of criminal justice. Having worked closely with Klaski, Jaksa has confidence that he is moving forward with a good head on his shoulders and a highly desirable skill-set.

"There are a lot of students in the United States who have good grades in the criminal justice program," Jaksa said. "Sloan has the benefit of outstanding grades in criminal justice plus the successful rigors of a student-athlete. That's going to show any federal law enforcement agency that this young man is going to be capable of taking on the stresses and rigors of their agency."

Though many students struggle to identify their field of study within their first few years of college, Klaski wasn't one of them. He described the desire to go into the field of criminal justice as a family business.

"Multiple members of my family were in the military including my dad, grandpa, two cousins and an uncle. That's part of the reason why the job I wanted to pursue was a service-related job."

The connection didn't stop there. Klaski explained that he also has a cousin who went the route of law enforcement, working as a police officer, as well as a close friend who works as a border patrol agent.

"All of these people have helped influence my journey and helped to steer me in the direction I'm headed," he said. "Ultimately, I would like to join the FBI and eventually become part of their special forces on the hostage rescue team."

Klaski has refused to let injuries stand in the way of helping others. While sidelined, he actively worked with young people through SVSU's Community Youth Days and Special Olympics.

"Sloan is one of those rare exceptions where he does everything 110 percent," Jaksa said. "A lot of people say they do it but Sloan really does. Between his grade point and knowing the amount of work he has to put into his classes to get that and being a football player: That's not an easy thing to do. There's no doubt in my mind that anything Sloan decides to do, he's going to be outstanding at it because of his mindset."

SVSU offered Klaski the chance to not only pursue his career goals and follow in the footsteps of so many of his family members before him, but it also gave him the opportunity to step out onto the field in a Cardinals uniform and play the game he loves every fall.

For this and so many other reasons, Klaski is grateful to SVSU.

"It just felt like the right place for me," he said.

Four years after arriving -- with degree in hand -- it will remain his place for a little while longer.

 

 

May 11, 2017

Iridian Juarez: Portrait of a 2017 SVSU graduate

From: Detroit

High school: Cesar Chavez Academy

Major: Social Work

Future: employed by Quicken Loans in Detroit

One shift.
That is all it took for Iridian Juarez to leave an impression in SVSU President Don Bachand’s office so strong that it led Mary Kowaleski, the president’s executive assistant, into a figurative tug-of-war for more of Juarez's time.

A social work major from Detroit, Juarez was working in SVSU’s Academic Affairs office when she filled a shift one day in Bachand's office. Shortly thereafter, Kowaleski was inquiring on how to get her back for more. A deal was struck where Juarez would split her time between Academic Affairs and Bachand’s office, where she communicated regularly with top university officials and other guests of the president.

“She has a lot of poise,” Kowaleski said. “She is always so extremely professional. She was so excellent with our guests.”

Juarez earned a placement in those offices through her work ethic and connections through SVSU’s School and University Partnerships office. Roberto Garcia, a school improvement and transition specialist there, worked closely with Juarez in a variety of functions and watched her develop a skillset that was, in some ways, beyond her years.

“She goes above and beyond in everything that she does,” Garcia said. “I have never seen her operate in mediocrity.”

Juarez graduated from SVSU in May 2017 and will begin a career with Quicken Loans in Detroit. There, she will participate in a yearlong program where she will try out four different career types, including client care and mortgage banking.

“Then I’ll be placed in whatever position I like the best or did the best in,” she said.

Quicken Loans is not exactly the typical landing spot for social work majors, but Juarez pursued an internship there that her friends recommended. Her social work education proved beneficial as she listened in on customer service calls and helped ensure representatives were treating customers appropriately. She impressed her supervisors and soon found herself in charge of a team of fellow interns whom she taught what to look for during the calls.

Juarez could eventually move into a position more closely related to social work. Quicken’s human resources department, for instance, has a team dedicated to coordinating volunteer opportunities for staff members.

“I really like the company and their culture,” she said.

Juarez shares the same feelings about SVSU. She graduated from Cesar Chavez Academy High School in Detroit, which is one of SVSU’s 18 public school academies. Her involvement in activities there showed her that she wanted to be “completely immersed in the college experience,” she said. She considered attending college closer to home, but that also meant she may have missed out on extracurricular opportunities.

“I didn’t think I would have the opportunities at one of those colleges that I’ve had at SVSU,” Juarez said. “It was one of the best decisions I have ever made.”

Juarez’s recollection of her first days on SVSU’s campus is “just how much people cared.” The events and tours aimed at the incoming freshmen made her feel welcome, she said.

“All the schools closer to home really ever did was send an email, say orientation was mandatory, see you there. No extra effort,” Juarez said. “I could see how Saginaw Valley really cared about its students compared to other schools.”

A first-generation college student from a working-class family, Juarez received the benefit of SVSU’s Public School Academy Scholarship and the university’s Transition Program.

“It was a change coming to SVSU, being away from home,” Juarez said. “A lot of people struggle with workload; in high school, your parents might be telling you to do your homework. In college, you have friends and things going on that might distract you. You need somebody to help you stay accountable with your academic goals.”

Driven to help others, Juarez volunteered part of her time on campus with student organizations such as the Latino Awareness Association and Alternative Breaks, which sends students to volunteer across the U.S. during winter and spring breaks. She traveled with a group of students to Orlando, Florida, to assist A Gift for Teaching, an organization that gives school supplies to teachers who then distribute the supplies to their students in need.

“The teachers were really, really grateful that we were there,” Juarez said. “It made me think of my teachers in the past who used their own money for supplies and how much of a burden it was for them, but they still did it. It led me to appreciate what teachers do and the students who want to go into that profession.”

Juarez performed her field work for the past two semesters through the Saginaw County Youth Protection Council’s Drug Education Center. She educated elementary students about the dangers of substance abuse.

The focus of those sessions differed based on the school. At Big Rock Elementary School in Chesaning, for example, Juarez spoke to students about tobacco use.

“After the lesson, they would say, ‘I don’t want to use this. I didn’t know it was this bad,’” Juarez said. “Now they know what the consequences are. That means something, even if they’re young.”

Excited to begin her career at Quicken, Juarez’s ultimate ambition is to utilize her social work background in a transition program to help incoming freshmen stay in school and graduate. And she hopes to do so as a Cardinal.

“I would love to come back to work for SVSU,” she said.

Juarez worked as a transition coach under Garcia, who is continually impressed by her passion for helping students overcome the same obstacles she did.

“I think the world of her and her story,” Garcia said.

 

May 10, 2017

Registration open for SVSU Literacy Center summer clinics

The Literacy Center at Saginaw Valley State University will offer tutoring in reading to students ranging from kindergarten upward through 12th grade, and adult learners during the upcoming summer.

Participating students attend 50-minute small group or one-on-one tutoring sessions Mondays to Thursdays from Monday, June 19 to Thursday, July 13, and can choose between sessions starting at 8 a.m., 9 a.m., 10 a.m., and 11 a.m. No sessions will be conducted the week of July 3. The Literacy Center is located in SVSU's Gilbertson Hall.
                
All students undergo a 1-hour assessment to determine their strengths and improvable areas in math, reading, or writing prior to tutoring. Assessments take place June 13 and 14, at 4 p.m., 5 p.m., and 6 p.m. A $50 non-refundable deposit is due at the time of, or before, the assessment.

Tutors then create individualized lesson plans based on the students' assessments and a research-based tutoring system to help students maximize their potential. All of the Literacy Center's tutors are certified teachers who hold master's degrees in literacy and/or certification in reading recovery, or a bachelor's or master's degree in a related field. The Literacy Center also offers resources and provides collaboration opportunities to parents and guardians who wish to be involved in the learning process.

Tuition for attending the Literacy Center is $270 per session. For more information, visit svsu.edu/literacycenter or contact Laurie Haney at 989-964-4982.

May 10, 2017

SVSU student examines causes of fraud in honors thesis

Nearly 16 years have passed since the public became aware of widespread fraud at Enron, an energy company that ultimately had one of the biggest bankruptcies in American history. Legislators have enacted stricter laws to try to prevent future such catastrophes, but just last month, banking giant Wells Fargo was outed in the latest scandal.

For her honors thesis, Saginaw Valley State University student Jessie Klisz sought to find out why high-level corporate fraud continues to happen. While each company’s story is different, there was one common theme, Klisz concluded.

“My main thesis idea was that Wall Street stock expectations are what primarily drive the need to commit this fraud,” Klisz said. “And I generally found that was true. It just differed on how it was perpetrated.”

An accounting major who graduated St. Clair High School and whose family now resides in the Detroit suburb of Beverly Hills, Klisz was one of 15 students from SVSU’s Honors Program to deliver their thesis presentations in April. She discussed and defended her findings to an audience of peers and university faculty and staff who then had the opportunity to ask her often-challenging questions. Her faculty advisor was Betsy Pierce, SVSU assistant professor of accounting.

“She got asked some really good, solid questions, which she did a really good job in answering,” Pierce said. “And it was helpful to have those questions, because she was able to bulk up her thesis a little bit more.”

Klisz researched nine companies and examined the evolution of their corporate cultures and how those cultures led to fraud. She read countless peer-reviewed articles from economic journals, some of which included interviews with the individuals who worked at the fraudulent companies, and filings made by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

Klisz found that regardless of which employees were the ones committing the fraud, it consistently was a result of pressure from top executives. Whereas with Enron and telecommunications giant WorldCom, the fraud was committed by those high-ranking executives, in more recent examples, the pressure from top executives led lower-level employees to commit the fraud, Klisz learned.

In the Wells Fargo scandal, employees opened banking and credit card accounts in the names of individuals who did not know those accounts were being opened. At HealthSouth, a healthcare provider, employees fixed a penny on transactions, but that ultimately caused a $750,000 difference in real earnings to those reported.

“In general, they were all fudging the numbers to make them meet their earnings that they were supposed to be meeting,” Klisz said. “In some cases, it started out so much smaller. They were like, ‘I’m just doing this tiny little thing,’ and then it would grow and grow and grow. Once you convince yourself that one small thing is OK, it’s not too hard to keep doing it.”

Klisz came to SVSU after receiving the President’s Scholarship, an academic scholarship. She joined the Honors Program, which allowed her to live in the same residence hall as other honors students.

“I wanted to live with people who have the same mindset,” Klisz said. “I met a lot of my friends living in the honors dorms.”

After taking her second class with Pierce, Klisz asked her to be her faculty advisor. Pierce, who mentored two honors students the year before, was happy to do so.

“It’s been a good working relationship the whole time she’s been here,” Pierce said of Klisz.

Pierce proved to be an ideal honors mentor because she came to SVSU with a research background.

“Coming here, I was really very excited about being able to introduce a research culture to the students, because I think it’s really important for them to learn these skills,” Pierce said. “It took me going back to school and changing my career to understand that this is what my mindset was like the whole time. If we can get them to do it while they’re in school, that just puts them in a better place when they go to work, because in the world of accounting, there is so much research that you have to do. So she has the skills now that she might not have had otherwise.”

While there are new laws that have brought stricter rules and penalties and there are continually new suggestions for fraud prevention, such as personality audits for executives, fraud is still “very, very hard to catch,” Klisz said.

“It’s constantly changing, and it’s constantly different,” she said. “People are still going to do it.”

Klisz completed her bachelor’s degree in accounting and participated in Commencement exercises at SVSU Friday, May 5.

Other students who delivered their honors thesis presentations in April were:

•    Katie L. Gall, an English major from Hemlock, whose presentation was titled “Is black so base a hue? A character analysis of Aaron in Shakespeare’s “Titus Andronicus.” Her faculty advisor was Daniel Gates, an associate professor of English.

•    Stephen J. Holihan, a biology major from Saginaw, whose presentation was titled “Developmental aromatase inhibition through endocrine disruption and the effects of sexually dimorphic morphology and brain organization in the Norway rat.” His faculty advisor was Gary Lange, a professor of biology.

•    Michaela M. Hoogerhyde, a marketing major from Mancelona, whose presentation was titled “Mood and luxury perception: A tale of two genders.” Her faculty advisor was Mazen Jaber, an associate professor of marketing.

•    Graceson C. Kerr, an exercise science major from Grand Blanc, whose presentation was titled “Primary care students’ perceptions of using physical activity counseling as a medical intervention.” Her faculty advisor was John Lowry, an assistant professor of kinesiology.

•    Tyler J. Lefevre, a biochemistry major from Bay City, whose presentation was titled “Validation of qPCR rapid bacterial quantification through viable E. Coli cell count in the Saginaw Bay Watershed.” His faculty advisor was Tami Sivy, an associate professor of chemistry.

•    Haley E. Livingston, a biology major from Holt, whose presentation was titled “A comparative examination of veterinary practice and opinion between the United States and France.” Her faculty advisor was Lange.

•    Bethany C. McCarry, a physics major from Auburn, whose presentation was titled “Frequency and temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility.” Her faculty advisor was Matthew Vannette, an associate professor of physics.

•    Victoria R. Phelps, an English major from Rochester Hills, whose presentation was titled “Depictions of disabilities once upon a time: Analyzing disabled characters in the context of Victorian fairy tales.” Her faculty advisor was Daniel Cook, an associate professor of English.

•    Emily K. Phillips, a graphic design major from Carleton, whose presentation was titled “Creating quality design for the restaurant industry: The rebranding of the White Horse Inn.” Her faculty advisor was Thomas Canale, a professor of art.

•    Cameron L. Pratt, an accounting major from Howell, whose presentation was titled “The equilibrium point hypothesis: An analysis of firm performance and renewable energy development in publicly held U.S. electrical utility companies. His faculty advisor was Mark McCartney, a professor of accounting.

•    Madison J. Rase, a chemistry major from Pinconning, whose presentation was titled “Anaerobic digestion of phragmites.” Her faculty advisor was David Karpovich, the Herbert H. Dow Endowed Professor of Chemistry.

•    Nicholas P. Toupin, a biochemistry major from Dearborn, whose presentation was titled “Effects of alkyl chain length on gel-forming carbohydrates.” His faculty advisor was Jennifer Chaytor, an assistant professor of chemistry.

•    Rachel J. Weller, an accounting major from Fenton, whose presentation was titled “Measuring up: An analysis of state CPA requirements and pass rates.” Her faculty advisor was McCartney.

•    Kylie M. Wojciechowski, a professional and technical writing major from Bay City, whose presentation was titled “Advocating for student-users: Results and recommendations of a usability study of the WCONLINE platform.” Her faculty advisor was William Williamson, a professor of rhetoric and professional writing.

May 9, 2017

How an SVSU grad and (wo)man's best friend changed the lives of wounded warriors

By Jason Wolverton

It’s mid-afternoon in early December and the Baltimore airport is abuzz with travelers as a chorus of conversations, gate announcements, and clicking suitcase wheels fill the air.

Aura sits attentively and takes it all in. Part golden retriever, part lab, she is here on assignment to carry out the same vital mission she’s been asked to carry out every day for the last two years: 

Listen.

A specially-trained hearing dog, Aura acts as the ears for SVSU alumna Gretchen Evans, an Army veteran wounded in Afghanistan in 2006. While serving a tour in Kabul, Evans’ unit took fire and a mortar explosion just 10 yards away left her deaf and suffering from a traumatic brain injury. Just like that, a decorated 27-year military career came to an end and Evans was left trying to adjust to a silent civilian life. 

That adjustment has come in the form of helping other veterans like herself. On this day, Evans is travelling to New York to speak on behalf of America’s VetDogs. The non-profit organization, which provides wounded veterans with service dogs, teamed Aura with Evans in January 2015. Now Evans sits on its board and travels the country with Aura, championing their cause and fulfilling a passion to help America’s wounded warriors.

It’s a passion that, in many ways, began at SVSU.

*

Of all the reasons to choose a university, it was a t-shirt that sold Evans on SVSU. 

Her husband, Robert Evans, became chief chaplain of the Aleda E. Lutz VA Medical Center in Saginaw and when they moved to the area she began looking for a place to continue her education. As a wounded veteran, the military would pay 100 percent of her tuition and she considered a number of area institutions. When she came to campus for a tour, the Admissions representative promptly gave both her and her husband some Cardinal swag. It was a personal touch that made Gretchen Evans feel at home. A life of military service provides many rewards, but one thing it does not offer is geographical stability. So when she ultimately decided to enroll at SVSU, it was the eighth university she’d attended. 

“I could have gone anywhere I wanted to,” she said, “but when they gave my husband a shirt, too, I just felt like this was the place for me. That simple act of caring and kindness sealed the deal.” 

Soon Evans connected with Career Services Director Mike Major — who recently formed the Cardinal Military Association for Veterans — as well as now-retired Dean of Students Merry Jo Brandimore. Together, they discussed navigating university life as a veteran, and Evans expressed interest in helping provide more and better services to fellow military-affiliated students. When Brandimore received approval from the Veterans Administration to employ two veteran work studies in her office, Evans got one of the jobs.

The work by Evans and Brandimore laid the foundation for what would eventually become the Military Student Affairs Office, founded in part by Denise Berry, who stepped down as director in 2016. SVSU was recognized by Military Times as part of its Best for Vets: Colleges 2017 Rankings. SVSU was ranked No. 34 among 130 four-year institutions across the country. 

“Individuals who have spent time in military service have different issues in transitioning to college life compared to other students,” Brandimore said.  

“I hope that the Office of Military Student Affairs is the one place our military students can go where someone understands the perspective of a student who has come from a military framework. Gretchen understands that and she always gave her all for these students because she felt every one of them was deserving of our best.”

Evans helped military students navigate everything from financial aid to classroom life, and in doing so, discovered a passion for serving her country in a new way: by helping its veterans.

“Working with military students was part of my healing process, too,” Evans said. “My whole adult life, I was in the military and I didn’t know anything else. It was healing for me to be able to give back and navigate a new life that I had been dealt.”

Evans was dealt another curveball when her husband was offered a job transfer as she was preparing to finish her degree. Determined to graduate, she stayed in Saginaw while her husband relocated. When their house sold, Evans moved on campus so she could finish her bachelor’s degree in sociology. At 54 years of age, she was the newest University Village resident. Evans graduated in May 2013.

“I can’t even articulate what it meant to graduate from SVSU,” Evans said. “I really felt like it was meant to be. My experience at SVSU was so phenomenal as both an adult student and also a wounded warrior. After 35 years and 40 countries, I finally had that diploma.”

And it almost never came to be. 

*

Evans’ military career began, in some ways, because of college. In 1978, she enrolled at Texas Tech University in Lubbock, Texas, and later at Austin College in Austin. She was paying for school all by herself and so she decided to enlist in the military. Her plan was to serve four years and leave with the G.I. Bill to pay for school. Instead, she fell in love with being in the Army and made a 28-year career of it. 

“Every time I stood before my fellow soldiers I felt humbled and honored to be among them,” Evans said. “They inspired me to be the best leader, soldier and person I could be.”

Throughout her time in the military, Evans earned every rank from private E1 to E9, the highest rank for an enlisted member. Her last duty assignment was in Kabul, Afghanistan, where she served as the Garrison Command Sergeant Major.

On Feb. 27, 2006, her unit began taking mortar fire at the forward operating base. She was standing out, yelling for everyone to get into the bunkers when the mortar that took her hearing hit to her right and blew her off her feet.

“I looked down to see if I had arms and legs,” she said. “I had an incredible headache and I couldn’t hear, but I didn’t realize I was permanently deaf until the doctors told me. You don’t realize how devastating it is to be able to hear your whole life and then suddenly not be able to anymore.”

She returned stateside, finished her rehabilitation and retired from the Army. An avid runner, Evans was jogging one day when a bicyclist ran into her trying to pass. He yelled to her that he was passing, but she couldn’t hear him coming up. Concerned for her safety, her doctors determined getting a safety dog would be in her best interest.

That’s when she met Aura. 

Aura helps Evans by responding to sounds, alerting her with a poke in the leg if she hears anything from a ringing phone to a knock on the door. Aura can also tell the difference between noises like an oven timer or fire alarm so Evans knows if there’s an emergency. Aura even alerts her to potential dangers while driving and will turn her head quickly if she hears a car horn. 

Evans said Aura also helps by alerting others she is deaf. Since Evans has what is known as an invisible injury, people she meets for the first time don’t realize she can’t hear them. She has grown adept at reading lips; but, if she can’t see the person who is talking, she doesn’t realize they are speaking to her. Having Aura by her side helps people recognize something is different. Aura also serves as a conversation starter, as people will focus more on Aura than Evans’ injury. 

“She keeps me safe and serves as an ambassador to the world for me,” Evans said. “She’s my family.”

The TODAY Show featured Evans and Aura recently during a segment as part of their Puppies with a Purpose series that focuses on its partnership with America’s VetDogs. The segment highlights several veterans who, like Evans, have benefited from the companionship and assistance of a service dog. 

“I knew my country was going to take care of me,” Evans said. “And Aura has given back so much of what was
taken away.”

May 9, 2017

After wife's death, SVSU faculty member discovers therapy for despair

By Jill Allardyce

It was just after midnight on a warm fall Saturday morning. The light rainfall had suddenly switched to a downpour during the 100-mile Hallucination trail race on Sept. 9, 2016. As the morning hours ticked on, the dusty dirt paths transformed to deep pockets of mashed mud. Visibility was becoming a problem for runners on that dark and challenging trail race in Pinckney, Michigan.

The soaking wet conditions took a toll on the 203 race entrants. Of them, 132 runners would eventually quit before finishing in the 30-hour time limit. Yet one runner, Brian Thomas, made a promise to himself that no foul weather would dampen his determination to finish this race. For him, this race was more significant than any other in his lifetime.

Brian had five 100-mile race entries under his belt. He discovered over a decade earlier that distance running helped him cope with stress, like when he and his college sweetheart-turned-wife, Holli Wallace, dealt with tuition debt while completing graduate and law school, respectively.

The couple grew together, from their 20s to their 30s, seeking out careers that fit their passions. He became a faculty member with SVSU’s sociology department as well as acting director of strategic partnerships and Study Abroad. She worked as an attorney helping underprivileged groups. They started a family with two sons, Elliott and Oliver. 

Then tragedy struck the family Oct. 16, 2013, when Holli unexpectedly died. She was 37.  

Three years later, the difficult conditions of this 100-mile race were no match to the despair Brian endured following his wife’s death. Still, both challenges collided along this dark trail. After all, it was his grief that propelled him forward into the night — and toward the hope that his example might help others dealing with the loss of a loved one.

*

‌Oct. 16, 2013, started out a regular day for Brian Thomas and his family. After finishing teaching his statistics course at SVSU, he hurried to pick up his son, Elliott, to take the then-7-year-old boy to karate lessons.

“I remember wondering if Holli would have Elliott in his karate uniform,” Brian said. “The last couple of months had been a little different in our hurried lives of young professionals.  Holli had left her 9-to-5 job as an attorney to focus her energy on politics, pro-bono legal work for the community, and, of course, our boys.”

When Brian arrived home, Elliott called up from the basement. He couldn’t wake up his mother.

“I quickly went over to her, remember shaking her right knee to wake her and knowing that something was seriously wrong,” Brian said. “I realized she wasn’t breathing.” 

He called 911 and began CPR. The paramedics arrived quickly and could not resuscitate Holli. Later, doctors discovered she died from mitral valve prolapse, an undiagnosed heart condition.  

Brian and his boys were lost in the weeks following her death. During that period, he often thought to himself, “Others have been through this — so shouldn’t we make it through OK?” 

He hoped at first, with a little patience and perseverance, the ache of losing his wife of 11 years would get easier. The words of others, support from friends, and sympathy cards filled him with hope he would be OK with “moving on” or “letting go” and would eventually find “acceptance” of living without her.

What he discovered was that grief wasn’t a race to finish, and he would need a different sort of stamina to endure
its challenges.  

*

Brian was at the 84-mile mark, with only 16 more miles to go. The course included six 16.6-mile loops. There was an inevitability to the sixth and final circuit. Yet the closer he came to the finish line, the farther away it seemed.

As the sun began to set once again and runners neared the end of the race, the darkness took over for a second time during this 30-hour challenge. The physical toll of the effort began to weigh on Brian mentally. Trees along the side of the pathway seemed like lurking bears, waiting to pounce in the darkness. The trail beneath his feet appeared to wind and move like a threatening snake. He felt a little unsure, but he knew there was nothing to fear. He would finish this. He had to finish this.

Thoughts of seeing Oliver and Elliot at the finish line — thoughts of Holli — helped him move forward.

*

About a year and a half after Holli died, the challenges of loss and grief remained with the family of three. At the request of eldest son Elliott, Brian sought out a support group. He found the recently formed Children’s Grief Center of the Great Lakes Bay Region. While the Midland-based institution specialized in helping children deal with loss, the therapy extended to Brian, too. 

Together, they faithfully attended meetings, even to this day. They healed together as they grieved through expression, using art, dance, theatre, storytelling and writing to share their feelings.

The experience helped Brian discover how to cope and move forward — doing what needs to be done in everyday life while still honoring the legacy of Holli.

“That’s the challenge that I woke up to the day after Holli died,” Brian said. “Memories are sometimes a double-edge sword for me. Part of me wants nothing more than to freeze everything in place and linger in the past. It took me several months to take her clothes from our closet. I wish Elliott and Oliver could forever wear the pants she sewed for them.”

Oliver was reaching a toddler’s developmental milestones that would require Brian to help him wean from his pacifier … learn to use the bathroom … transitioning from a crib to a “big-boy bed” and, eventually, start school.  Both children needed Brian to remain strong and lead the family through everything to come.

“It can be dangerous lingering too much in the past as the world moves forward,” he said. “Holli is so much a part of who I am in my heart and soul. I think about her every day to draw my strength. At the same time, I know that I have to keep moving forward without her by my side.”

Work provided one coping mechanism. Brian earned accolades over the years for his approach to teaching sociology as well as his efforts in assisting SVSU’s Study Abroad program. His accomplishments included founding the Green Cardinal Initiative, which featured SVSU students, faculty and staff promoting environmental friendliness. His exceptional work continued after Holli’s death. Later that same year, he was one of 11 recipients of the Ruby Award, given annually to the Great Lakes Bay Region’s most remarkable professionals under the age of 40. 

Although he didn’t realize it at the time, Brian in retrospect realized his running strategies also helped him approach each new day after his wife’s death. He moved forward in small increments, with what he calls “The 10 Percent Rule.” In running, this applies to increasing week-by-week mileage in increments of 10 percent. It’s applied to prevent injuries that would result from over use of a muscle.   

“Early on, I began envisioning being without her at small moments, like dinner in the evening or for the upcoming weekend, before trying to think about major events like holidays,” he said. “I practiced retelling the events of the day that she died in my mind, and then to people close to me so that I could move myself closer to a stage where I could talk openly about her to strangers.”

Having a good support system of friends and family to make decisions and carry the load is important, he realized. Life can offer heavy burdens. 

“In truth, I have a very independent personality,” he said. “That’s a problem sometimes and I have had to learn to reach out for help. With the help of grandparents, friends, neighbors and teachers, the boys and I made our way.”   

Brian made a point to never ignore his pain. He recognized it and tried to learn when to talk about it or ask for help.

“I look for pain that may be leading me to make bad decisions or unable to function well for extended periods,” he said. “I’d like to say that the distinction is easy to make, but it isn’t. Through trial and sometimes error, I like to think that I am better at it than when I started this journey.”

Brian raised more than $7,700 in pledges for the Children’s Grief Center as part of his participation in the Hallucination race in September. Even though Holli was not there in body, he was determined to run with her in spirit. He wore her name on his chest — “RUN FOR HOLLI,” his shirt read — as a celebration of all that she represented. 

“She was one of those people who seemed like she was everywhere at once,” Brian said. 

“She could not be summed up in single words or even short phrases. She was, at best, a long list.  She was a mother, a daughter, a wife, a friend, an attorney, an activist, a caretaker, a community volunteer, a political leader, an idealist, a seamstress, a cook, and a lifelong fan of The Bold and The Beautiful. The list goes on.”  

That list is a legacy that remains strong for her family.

*

It was near the end of the Hallucination race when Brian first spotted the faint green glow near the finish line. As he approached, he recognized the source of the light as a sight he spent much of the last 100 miles thinking about: Elliott and Oliver, both wearing glow bracelets.

Brian’s sons shrieked in excitement when they recognized their dad. The boys ran toward him. A few steps from the end of the race, they embraced as a family — minus one. 

In struggling with the loss of Holli these last few years, Brian realized there was no finish line for grief. There was no medal to collect and no accomplishment to celebrate. The road for that race remained unendingly ahead for him and his sons. 

Still, they moved forward — stepping over the Hallucination’s finish line together — in this run for Holli; in this tribute to the life she left for them all.

May 5, 2017

SVSU Board approves new master’s degree in computer science

The Saginaw Valley State University Board of Control approved a new graduate program, a master’s degree in computer science and information systems, during the Board’s regular meeting Friday, May 5.

In developing the program, SVSU faculty solicited feedback from auto companies such as Ford and Nexteer, as well a number of other firms from Auto-Owners Insurance to Yeo and Yeo. Government agencies, such as the U.S. Department of Defense, also evaluated the proposal. All of the reviewers indicated a growing demand for informational technology professionals with advanced degrees and supported SVSU’s proposed program.

“We have done our homework and we anticipate strong interest in this program right away,” said Frank Hall, dean of SVSU’s College of Science, Engineering and Technology. “Our computer science and information systems faculty have done an outstanding job designing a curriculum that is flexible enough to meet students’ interests while also emphasizing the technical needs expressed by employers.”

SVSU will begin enrolling students for the new master’s degree program immediately. The first courses will be offered this coming fall.

In other action ,the Board:
•    Passed a resolution to congratulate the 2016-2017 SVSU women's basketball team, which advanced to the second round of the NCAA Division II women’s basketball tournament.
•    Passed a resolution to congratulate the 2016-2017 SVSU women's tennis team, which finished with an overall record of 15-5, its best season in more than 15 years.
•    Passed a resolution to thank Cody McKay, president, and elected representatives of the SVSU Student Association for their service during the 2016-17 academic year.
•    Passed a resolution to congratulate Lauren Kreiss, president, and representatives of the Student Association elected to serve during the 2017-18 academic year.
•    Passed a resolution to elect Board officers for 2017-18. Jenee Velasquez will continue to serve as chair; John Kunitzer will serve as vice chair. Dennis Durco will perform the duties of secretary, and Vicki Rupp will serve as treasurer.
•    Passed a resolution to grant undergraduate and graduate degrees. More than 1,000 students will participate in Commencement exercises Friday, May 5 and Saturday, May 6.
•    Passed a resolution to approve the appointment of Samuel Tilmon to the board of the Marshall M. Fredericks Sculpture Museum.
•    Passed a resolution codifying how contractual authority is delegated. The Board retains authority over all contracts in excess of $250,000.
•    Passed a resolution to update the SVSU Purchasing Policy, which was last amended in 2004.
•    Passed a resolution to establish the Board’s meeting schedule for the 2017-18 academic year.

May 4, 2017

SVSU Cardinal Formula Racing members pushing their limits in advance of international contest

The hard-working, motivated members of the Saginaw Valley State University Cardinal Formula Racing team are hoping for a top 10 finish this year at the at the Formula Society of Automotive Engineers (FSAE) Collegiate Design Series on May 10-13 at Michigan International Speedway in Brooklyn, Michigan.

Brooks Byam, SVSU professor of mechanical engineering and the team's faculty advisor since 1998, said he has high hopes for the group.

“I’m proud to say we have talented, motivated, and innovative students on this year's team,” he said.

This year's team members have devoted long hours to careful testing as they seek to combine performance and stability and meet a team goal of winning the acceleration event, and be the fastest car to drive a 75-meter straight track at the competition. SVSU twice has built the fastest race car in the world, winning the acceleration category in 2008 and 2014.

Alex Ginn, a mechanical engineering major from Trenton, is one of those Cardinal Formula Racing team members who has spent countless hours in the race shop preparing for competition.

“We are trying for another top 10 performance this year,” Ginn said.
 
The annual FSAE Collegiate Design Series competition features about 120 teams, from world-renowned colleges and universities with esteemed mechanical engineering programs. Teams from higher education institutions across the globe design and build Indy-style race cars to compete at the series, which features multiple competition categories such as endurance, acceleration, autocross, cost, presentation, and skid pad.

Each of the past two years, SVSU posted the top score among schools without a graduate program in engineering.  

“We are the most successful fully undergraduate team in the history of the FSAE,” Ginn said.

In 2016, SVSU finished 30th overall, ahead of teams such as the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor (No. 46), Northwestern (No. 53) and Georgia Tech (No. 54).

“Our students have put in the time. I am hopeful they and the race car will perform up to their capabilities,” said Byam, who in 2013 won the Carroll Smith Mentor’s Cup, given annually to one outstanding Society of Automotive Engineers faculty advisor.

Cardinal Formula Racing has placed in the top 20 four times overall: 6th place in 2002, 8th in 2005, 14th  in 2008 and 18th  in 2010.

Graduates of SVSU’s program are highly desired by automotive companies and other manufacturers, though some have chosen other paths.

Nevin Steinbrink started his own engineering firm in Old Town Saginaw. (http://www.svsu.edu/newsroom/news/2017/firstroboticscardinalformularacing/firstroboticscardinalformularacingprovidefoundationforbusinessstarted.html)

Midland native Allen Hart is an engineer for J.R. Motorsports on the NASCAR Xfinity Series; his team finished runner- up at the Dash 4 Cash event at Richmond International Raceway in Virginia last weekend.
(http://www.jrmracing.com/media/2017/01/31/what-to-watch-for-in-2017-no-7-brandt-professional-agriculture-team)

For more information on SVSU’s Cardinal Formula Racing program, visit http://www.svsu.edu/cardinalformularacing/.

May 4, 2017

SVSU commencement: a day of celebration for student who overcame life-threatening disease

‌In Sarah Tennyson’s bedroom, the dozens of cards featuring inspirational quotes only seem to outnumber the smiley-faced stickers by a few.‌Sarah Tennyson, a May 2017 grad, in the courtyard with the bell tower at her back.

“I like to stay positive and keep a positive outlook on life,” the 30-year-old said.

It's an optimism, she admitted, that at first might seem odd coming from someone once kept alive by a feeding tube; from someone who, long before and well after the feeding tube, has moved through the world largely via wheelchair.

In Sarah Tennyson's world, though, there's plenty to celebrate. And that celebration is sure to grow more jubilant later this week when the Saginaw Township native joins more than 1,000 of her Saginaw Valley State University student peers on stage during commencement ceremonies.

Tennyson, a communications major, will participate in the festivities Saturday at 11 a.m. in O'Neill Arena, when students from the colleges of Arts & Behavioral Sciences; Education; and Science, Engineering & Technology are honored. A 7:30 p.m. Friday ceremony will feature students in the colleges of Business & Management and Health & Human Services.

Tennyson has two classes still to complete, but will be participating in the May Commencement ceremony, which she finds fitting. She always imagined celebrating her accomplishment in the mellow comforts of springtime. It was a fantasy that pre-dated her brush with a disease that nearly prevented her from living to see such a day at all.

Tennyson was no stranger to overcoming obstacles when that dangerous medical condition upended her world during her late 20s. Her first medical obstacle arrived on the day of her birth. Born three months earlier than expected, Tennyson as a baby was diagnosed with cerebral palsy, a neurological disorder that impairs motor functions. As a result, she has spent her life in a wheelchair.

More medical hardships followed, but Tennyson continued to pursue college education, and she has made quite an impression on Dick Thompson, SVSU ombudsman, whose tenure at SVSU began in 1970. He called Tennyson “one of the most positive and caring students I have ever had the pleasure to work with.”

Thompson helped Tennyson navigate some of the logistical challenges that emerged when her medical condition threatened to derail her studies.

“I admire her for her courage and determination,” he said. “She is the best of the best.”

During her K-12 years, Tennyson attended a school for individuals with disabilities before eventually graduating from Community Baptist Christian High School in Saginaw. She still lives in the home where she was raised, and said her parents and older sister — along with a deep faith in her Christian beliefs — provided a support system that allowed her eventually to pursue a postsecondary education. She earned an associate’s degree from Delta College in 2009, and then enrolled at SVSU.

Tennyson’s tenure at the university, though, was derailed five years ago when she suffered what she initially believed was a “stomach bug.” The problem persisted for about a week by the time Tennyson was scheduled to participate in SVSU’s Sims Public Speaking Competition in November 2012.

“I told myself, ‘I’m not going to miss this speech competition,” she said, “but by the end of the day, I was in the ER, vomiting.”

The situation grew serious enough that medics — fearing for her life — removed her gall bladder and inserted a feeding tube into her body.

“They didn’t know what was going on at first,” she said.

Eventually, doctors diagnosed her with gastroparesis, which is a disorder that stops or slows the movement of food from the stomach to the small intestine.

For a time, her weight dropped from 100 lbs. to 75 lbs. Problems persisted until she switched to a new doctor, whose prescriptions helped her recover some of her physical strength in the ensuing years.

“I’m not where I want to be quite yet,” she said. “I’m getting there.”

The medical challenges slowed — but didn’t stop — the pursuit of her bachelor’s degree. She returned to SVSU in fall 2013 but dropped out before the end of the semester.

“Trying to get myself back to school was a roller coaster ride,” she said. “I would take two steps forward, then one step back. There were times when I didn’t think I was going to be able to finish.”

She returned to SVSU again in August 2016, when she signed up for a single kinesiology course.

“I was in physical therapy at the time and I wanted to know how my body worked,” she said.

Despite falling seriously ill again in November 2016, she has remained enrolled at the university, with expectations that she will earn her degree this year. Along with her family, friends, faith and her medical support team, Tennyson credited SVSU staff and faculty with aiding her in those academic pursuits.

“I’ve had a huge support system,” she said.

While she is quick to give others credit, Thompson said Tennyson’s sense of determination and persevering spirit were the most important factors in her accomplishments.

“Despite all her challenges, Sarah never gave up on her dreams,” he said.

After earning her bachelor’s degree, she hopes to pursue a career helping others with disabilities and social challenges as they strive to reach their potential. That sort of ambition is familiar to Tennyson.

“Everyone has their difficulties,” she said. “Some are just more visible than others, like mine. I had a lot of support to get to where I am, and now I want to give back to others.”

May 1, 2017

SVSU honors students deliver thesis presentations

Fifteen students from Saginaw Valley State University’s Honors Program delivered their thesis presentations Friday, April 7, inside Gilbertson Hall on SVSU’s campus.
 
The topics during the honors symposium ranged from disabled characters in Victorian fairy tales to veterinarian practices in the United States and France to the culture of fraud in the United States.
 
The SVSU Honors Program is a competitive program that selects 80 incoming freshmen students per year. It allows students to pursue their major and minor degree work while providing enriched academic experiences in honors courses, seminars, research projects and social activities.
 
The thesis presentation, during which students discuss and defend their findings to an audience of peers and university faculty and staff, is the culmination of their time in the program. The following students presented:
 
Katie L. Gall, an English major from Hemlock, whose presentation was titled “Is black so base a hue? A character analysis of Aaron in Shakespeare’s “Titus Andronicus.” Her faculty advisor was Daniel Gates, an associate professor of English.
 
Stephen J. Holihan, a biology major from Saginaw, whose presentation was titled “Developmental aromatase inhibition through endocrine disruption and the effects of sexually dimorphic morphology and brain organization in the Norway rat.” His faculty advisor was Gary Lange, a professor of biology.
 
Michaela M. Hoogerhyde, a marketing major from Mancelona, whose presentation was titled “Mood and luxury perception: A tale of two genders.” Her faculty advisor was Mazen Jaber, an associate professor of marketing.
 
Graceson C. Kerr, an exercise science major from Grand Blanc, whose presentation was titled “Primary care students’ perceptions of using physical activity counseling as a medical intervention.” Her faculty advisor was John Lowry, an assistant professor of kinesiology.
 
Jessie R. Klisz, an accounting major from Beverly Hills, whose presentation was titled “Fraud in the United States and the culture that cultivates it.” Her faculty advisor was Besty Pierce, an assistant professor of accounting.
 
Tyler J. Lefevre, a biochemistry major from Bay City, whose presentation was titled “Validation of qPCR rapid bacterial quantification through viable E. Coli cell count in the Saginaw Bay Watershed.” His faculty advisor was Tami Sivy, an associate professor of chemistry.
 
Haley E. Livingston, a biology major from Holt, whose presentation was titled “A comparative examination of veterinary practice and opinion between the United States and France.” Her faculty advisor was Lange.
 
Bethany C. McCarry, a physics major from Auburn, whose presentation was titled “Frequency and temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility.” Her faculty advisor was Matthew Vannette, an associate professor of physics.
 
Victoria R. Phelps, an English major from Rochester Hills, whose presentation was titled “Depictions of disabilities once upon a time: Analyzing disabled characters in the context of Victorian fairy tales.” Her faculty advisor was Daniel Cook, an associate professor of English.
 
Emily K. Phillips, a graphic design major from Carleton, whose presentation was titled “Creating quality design for the restaurant industry: The rebranding of the White Horse Inn.” Her faculty advisor was Thomas Canale, a professor of art.
 
Cameron L. Pratt, an accounting major from Bay City, whose presentation was titled “The equilibrium point hypothesis: An analysis of firm performance and renewable energy development in publicly held U.S. electrical utility companies. His faculty advisor was Mark McCartney, a professor of accounting.
 
Madison J. Rase, a chemistry major from Pinconning, whose presentation was titled “Anaerobic digestion of phragmites.” Her faculty advisor was David Karpovich, the Herbert H. Dow Endowed Professor of Chemistry.
 
Nicholas P. Toupin, a biochemistry major from Dearborn, whose presentation was titled “Effects of alkyl chain length on gel-forming carbohydrates.” His faculty advisor was Jennifer Chaytor, an assistant professor of chemistry.
 
Rachel J. Weller, an accounting major from Fenton, whose presentation was titled “Measuring up: An analysis of state CPA requirements and pass rates.” Her faculty advisor was McCartney.
 
Kylie M. Wojciechowski, an undecided major from Bay City, whose presentation was titled “Advocating for student-users: Results and recommendations of a usability study of the WCONLINE platform.” Her faculty advisor was William Williamson, a professor of rhetoric and professional writing.