Skip to main content Skip to footer
Link to feedback form Link to feedback form

 

Native American Heritage Month

Dr. Arthur C. Parker, a Seneca Indian, who was the director of the Museum of Arts and Science in Rochester, N.Y. persuaded the Boy Scouts of America to set aside a day for the “First Americans” and for three years they adopted such a day. In 1915, the annual Congress of the American Indian Association meeting formally approved a plan concerning American Indian Day. It directed its president, Rev. Sherman Coolidge, an Arapahoe, to call upon the country to observe such a day. Coolidge issued a proclamation on Sept. 28, 1915, which declared the second Saturday of each May as an American Indian Day.

The first American Indian Day in a state was declared on the second Saturday in May 1916 by the governor of New York. Presently, several states have designated Columbus Day as Native American Day, but it continues to be a day we observe without any recognition as a national legal holiday.

In 1990 President George H. W. Bush approved a joint resolution designating November 1990 “National American Indian Heritage Month.” Similar proclamations, under variants on the name (including “Native American Heritage Month” and “National American Indian and Alaska Native Heritage Month”), have been issued each year since 1994.

The Office of Multicultural Student Affairs aims to sponsor and host events that educate and bring awareness to the campus community on the Native American heritage through performances, speakers, and discussions.

For more information visit, https://nativeamericanheritagemonth.gov/